Archives: Discrimination

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Emerging Labor & Employment Law Trends (Part 2)

With summer 2016 almost behind us, employers should begin to plan for the major labor and employment law trends expected to emerge in the last quarter of the year and into 2017. In the first part of this two-part series, we looked at some of the principal trends likely to be shaped by federal regulators.  … Continue Reading

Emerging Labor & Employment Law Trends (Part 1)

With summer 2016 almost behind us, employers should begin to plan for the major labor and employment law trends expected to emerge in the final quarter of the year and into 2017. In the first part of this two-part series, we will take a look at some of the principal trends likely to be shaped … Continue Reading

Reminder for NYC Employers: Ban on ‘Caregiver’ Discrimination Has Taken Effect

On May 4, a New York City law barring discrimination against “caregivers” took effect. Specifically, the law prohibits employers from taking an adverse action (e.g., refusing to hire, firing, or demoting), or otherwise discriminating against an employee with respect to the terms and conditions of employment, based on the employee’s actual or perceived status as … Continue Reading

Gov. Christie Vetoes Proposed Equal Pay Act Again as ‘Business Unfriendly’

On May 2, 2016, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, for the second time, issued a conditional veto of proposed legislation that would bar gender-based pay discrimination, saying in part that the Bill would go too far beyond federal standards and make New Jersey “very business unfriendly.” In an effort to address and remediate gender-pay gaps … Continue Reading

This Is Not a Prank: California’s New Amended FEHA Regulations Are Effective April 1

California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (“FEHA”) prohibits harassment and discrimination in the workplace that is based on one or more of the categories commonly protected by local, state and federal discrimination laws. On April 1, 2016, new regulations interpreting and expanding upon the statutory language go into effect. Below, we provide a summary of some … Continue Reading

Objective Basis Needed for Psychological Fitness for Duty Exam

In a case of first impression in New Jersey, the Appellate Division cautioned that employers may only require an employee to undergo a mental health fitness-for-duty examination in limited circumstances.  Relying heavily on the EEOC’s Enforcement Guidance, the Court held that such examinations are only permitted when an employer “has a reasonable belief, based on … Continue Reading

DOL Seeks to Expand the Definition of Illegal Discrimination

We round out our series on recent federal agency action by discussing the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) recent Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). The Proposed Rules would update existing nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the WIOA, which is the DOL’s primary mechanism for providing job training funding. … Continue Reading

EEOC Guidance on Retaliation: An Unprecedented Interpretation of Federal EEO Law

This next installment of our ongoing series takes a closer look into the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation and Related Issues. Last week, we discussed the EEOC’s changing views regarding the elements of a retaliation claim. This week, we delve deeper into the EEOC’s proposed guidance, exploring the agency’s attempt to … Continue Reading

EEOC Guidance on Retaliation: Make It Easier For Employees To Prove Their Case

This installment of our ongoing series on federal regulatory actions impacting employers examines the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation and Related Issues. The proposed update would replace the 1998 version of the EEOC Compliance Manual on Retaliation and address the courts’ significant rulings in the decades following the current … Continue Reading

Ending the Year With A Bang: NYC Bans “Caregiver” Discrimination and Issues Sweeping Gender Identity/Expression Discrimination Guidance

So much for a quiet year-end for New York City employers. In the final weeks of 2015, NYC government officials took two actions that will have a significant impact on the city’s business community, first passing a bill banning “caregiver” discrimination and then, just days later, issuing sweeping guidance regarding gender identity and expression discrimination. … Continue Reading

New York Employment Law Roundup: October & November 2015

Today’s New York employment law landscape is increasingly dynamic, with a constant stream of newly issued legislation and judicial opinions. To keep our readers current on the latest developments, we will share regular summaries of recent developments affecting Empire State employers. Here’s what happened in October and November 2015: NYC Agency Issues Guidance on New … Continue Reading

Reminder for NYC Employers: Ban on Credit Checks Takes Effect Today

A new law restricting the pre-employment process takes effect in New York City today, September 3, 2015 (the Law).  As we previously reported, the Law bars most employers in NYC from requesting or considering, for employment purposes, a prospective or current employee’s “consumer credit history” – which means the creditworthiness, credit standing, credit capacity, or … Continue Reading

Stressed Out By Your Supervisor? Too Bad, Say California Courts

California employers may finally rejoice: there is now an employer-friendly state court decision, Higgins-Williams v. Sutter Med. Found., 237 Cal. App. 4th 78 (2015). The case takeaway is straightforward: an employee’s claimed inability to work under a supervisor because of the supervisor’s causing the employee anxiety and stress during standard oversight of the employee’s performance, … Continue Reading

‘School’s Out!’ Means More Free Time for Kids, But None for Working Parents. Here is Help for Employers Managing the Fallout.

This post was also written by Lindsay J. Freid. As our nation’s built-in babysitters close shop for the next three months, the bulk of our nation’s workforce braces for the barrage of new summer stressors, including: the uncertain reliability of teenage babysitters needed to cover 7-8 extra childcare hours per day; the effective imposition of second … Continue Reading

Transgender at Work: How Employers Can Stay Off the EEOC Radar Screen

It’s no secret that the EEOC—and even some courts—read Title VII to prohibit discrimination against transgender employees. A growing number of state and city laws also specifically include gender identity and/or expression as protected characteristics. But while employers may understand the legal dangers of firing someone for “coming out” as transgender, the extent of employers’ … Continue Reading

EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch: Do You Need to Ask Applicants Whether They Require Religious Accommodation?

This post was written by Stephanie Wilson, James A. Burns, Jr., and Megan E. Farrell. On June 1, 2015, the United States Supreme Court held that a job applicant can establish religious discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 without proof that the employer had “actual knowledge” of the applicant’s need … Continue Reading

BREAKING: NYC “Bans the Box,” Barring Most Pre-Employment Criminal Inquiries

Just weeks after prohibiting employers from using credit checks, the New York City Council Wednesday passed yet another bill that handcuffs businesses attempting to vet new job applicants. Most notably, the bill, commonly referred to as the Fair Chance Act (the Act), bars employers from inquiring about a job applicant’s criminal history before extending a conditional offer … Continue Reading

New York Employment Roundup: March & April 2015

This post was written by Cindy S. Minniti and Mark S. Goldstein. Today’s New York employment law landscape is increasingly dynamic, with a constant stream of newly issued legislation and judicial opinions. To keep our readers current on the latest developments, we will share regular summaries of recent developments affecting Empire State employers. Here’s what … Continue Reading

Breaking: NYC Council Bars Most Pre-Employment Credit Checks

This post was written by Cindy S. Minniti and Mark S. Goldstein. New York City employers who routinely use credit checks as part of the pre-employment process may be in for a rude awakening. Earlier today, the NYC Council passed legislation that bars most employers with four or more employees, as well as employment agencies, … Continue Reading

Term Limitations in Competitive Sports: Are All German Professional Sports Contracts Invalid?

The Labour Court Mainz is currently creating quite a stir in German professional sports. For decades, it was customary and recognized by the courts that contracts of professional athletes could be limited. The Labor Court in Mainz now sees this differently. German goalkeeper Heinz Müller brought an action against his club Mainz 05. He had … Continue Reading

UK update – Type 2 diabetes controlled by diet is not automatically a disability

This post was written by David Ashmore and Amy Treppass. In Metroline Travel v Stoute, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) decided that employees with type 2 diabetes controlled by diet (rather than medication) are not automatically protected by disability discrimination legislation. The Facts Mr Stoute was employed by Metroline and worked for them as a … Continue Reading

Employment Appeal Tribunal gives guidance on what constitutes sufficient knowledge of a disability to give rise to a duty to make reasonable adjustments

In Donelien v Liberata, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) has held that an employer did not have constructive knowledge of an employee’s disability, even though further steps could have been taken to investigate her condition. Background Under the Equality Act 2010, employers are obliged to make reasonable adjustments to help disabled employees overcome disadvantages arising … Continue Reading

European Court confirms obesity can be a disability under EU law

In our previous blog, “Are obese workers protected from discrimination” , we confirmed the advocate general’s opinion in the case of Kaltoft v Municipality of Billund (case C-354/13) that while obese workers were not automatically covered by EU disability discrimination law, the worker may be considered to be disabled where he or she is “severely, … Continue Reading
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