In the past several weeks, Pokémon Go has taken the world, and many workplaces, by storm. If you’re concerned about reducing the negative impact that this game may be having on your employees’ productivity – and, more importantly, their safety – here are five steps you can take:

1. Make sure that your corporate policies for use of email, internet, and electronic devices are up to date. The policies should state the parameters and limitations regarding the use of these tools for personal matters. If your company allows for reasonable use of internet and personal email, the policy should state that an employee’s personal activity should not interfere with his or her job responsibilities. Ideally, a policy will also include a non-exhaustive list of sites, apps, games, and other programs that employees should not access at work. Examples, such as Pokémon Go, can also be listed. A specific social media policy that limits personal use of sites such as Facebook and Instagram should be included, as well. The policy should also limit personal use of mobile phones during work hours. In drafting or revising any policies, be sure that you take into account the recent decisions of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). These decisions strike down common personnel policies on the grounds that they could lead reasonable employees to believe they may face discipline for engaging in protected activity with or on behalf of one or more co-workers relating to employees’ wages, hours, or other terms or conditions of employment.Continue Reading Five Tips for Handling Pokémon Go in the Workplace

No online shopping day is bigger than Cyber Monday. According to the National Retail Federation, an estimated 127 million people shopped on Cyber Monday last year—significantly more than the estimated 87 million in-store, Black Friday shoppers. In fact, Cyber Monday 2014 brought online retailers a staggering $2.5 billion in sales.

Given the temptation Cyber Monday provides to employees to use company and/or personal devices to shop for deals while at work, the shoppers’ “holiday” – like its springtime counterpart for sports fans, March Madness – serves as a reminder for employers: you would be wise to plan ahead, including by reviewing and updating your computer-use and monitoring policies. Below we offer some practical and legal considerations employers should keep in mind when deciding the appropriate scope of policies that limit employees’ at-work, personal use of company-provided devices.
Continue Reading Employers’ Thanksgiving Plans Should Include Cyber Monday Prep: Are Your Computer Policies Up to Date?