Tag Archives: Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Counting employees under FFCRA and the CARES Act is not necessarily as easy as 1-2-3

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), both enacted last week, provide significant new federal benefits to small businesses and their employees. Critically, both statutes target smaller employers. To that end, they each contain provisions that are only applicable to employers with fewer than … Continue Reading

COVID-19 FAQs for employers with U.S. employees

Please see an updated version of our FAQs as of April 18, 2020 The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has had, and will continue to have, a substantial impact on the U.S. workplace. Below is a series of FAQs we have compiled based on some of the more common questions that clients with U.S.-based employees have posed … Continue Reading

Gov. Newsom signs bill to expand CFRA rights

On October 10, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom officially signed a bill expanding protected leave rights under the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) to flight crew employees. We covered this issue in more detail here. The new law will allow flight crew employees to be eligible for CFRA protected leave with certain conditions.… Continue Reading

California legislature passes expansion of CFRA rights for flight crew employees

The California Legislature has recently passed a new bill to expand the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) to flight deck and cabin crew employees (pilots and flight attendants). The new bill conforms California’s CFRA to the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) with regard to protected leave. Currently under the CFRA, employees are eligible … Continue Reading

New EEOC Rules Require U.S. Employers To Revise Procedures for Acquiring and Using Medical Information

On January 10, 2011, employers will become subject to new regulations issued by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) that interpret the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (“GINA”). Employers must now comply with GINA’s tough restrictions on the acquisition, use, and disclosure of genetic information about applicants, employees, former employees, and all such individuals’ … Continue Reading
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