As of March 12, 2024, New York employers are prohibited from requesting or obtaining access to the personal social media accounts of employees and applicants. Specifically, employers are not permitted to require employees or applicants to: (i) disclose their user names, passwords, or log-in information, (ii) access personal accounts in the presence of the employer; or (iii) reproduce any posts, including photos and videos, from personal accounts. In addition, employers may not discharge, discipline, or otherwise penalize an employee or applicant because of their refusal to disclose such information. Continue Reading New York places limitations on employer access to employee social media

On January 29, 2024, the Delaware Supreme Court issued an important decision addressing the enforceability of restrictive covenants. As detailed below, in Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the court upheld forfeiture-for-competition provisions set forth in a limited partnership (LP) agreement and ruled in favor of the partnership not having to pay out millions to former partners.

Key highlights

In Cantor Fitzgerald, the Delaware Supreme Court decision relied significantly on the following factors in enforcing the LP agreement as written and determining that the disputed provisions were, in fact, enforceable:

  • The restrictive covenant did not bar the claimants from engaging in competitive activities.
  • Rather, the provisions in question provided, in part, that receipt and retention of prior conditional awards of a portion of their compensation would be subject to the condition precedent that the recipient refrained from competing – in other words, these were forfeiture-for-competition provisions.
  • These forfeiture-for-competition provisions were not liquidated damages provisions (triggered by a breach of contract); rather, these provisions set up a condition precedent (not competing with the employer) to the employees’ receipt of the amounts that had been held back. 
  • The “employee choice doctrine” suggests that courts do not review forfeiture-for-competition provisions for reasonableness where, as here, the employee voluntarily terminates employment (as opposed to remaining employed and vesting in the contingent compensation amounts).

Continue Reading Delaware Supreme Court confirms enforceability of restrictive covenant provisions in favor of employer-partnership, reversing Chancery Court determination

It is indisputable that artificial intelligence (AI) has generated enormous buzz over the past several years. AI has had a substantial impact on various industries and facets of society – with no signs of slowing – and its potential to disrupt longstanding business mechanisms cannot be overstated.

Among the areas most impacted by AI is the workplace.  Indeed, AI and generative artificial intelligence (GAI) are readily used – and, as will be discussed, sometimes misused – every day by millions of U.S. employees. Companies utilize these sophisticated tools for a myriad of reasons, including to boost development, increase productivity, and stay ahead of the proverbial curve.

In this multipart series, we will address a host of issues associated with the interplay between AI and GAI, on the one hand, and the U.S. workplace, on the other hand. And in this particular article, we will break down what we specifically mean when referring to AI and GAI and, also, how federal, state, and local legislatures are responding to the rise in workplace-related AI issues. Future articles will address how AI and GAI are impacting the workplace as well as challenges employers face with the adoption of AI and GAI tools in the workplace.Continue Reading How artificial intelligence is impacting the U.S. workplace (Part I)

In December 2021, the New York City Council passed a novel, first-of-its-kind law addressing the use of artificial intelligence – specifically, automated employment decision tools – by businesses to make employment decisions. The law, which has the potential to seismically change how employers approach employment decisions, essentially bars businesses from using automated employment decision tools

On December 21, 2022, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed the Warehouse Worker Protection Act (WWPA) into law. The WWPA is intended to protect warehouse workers from unreasonably demanding work quotas and goes into effect on February 19, 2023.

As detailed in this post, the WWPA establishes new requirements for distribution centers to disclose work

On December 8, 2022, three New York City Council Members proposed a workplace-related bill that would essentially do away with the concept of “at will” employment in the Big Apple. Suffice it to say, the proposed bill would, if passed, be an absolute game changer for businesses in one of the country’s largest commercial markets.

As we previously reported, effective tomorrow (November 1, 2022), New York City law will require that virtually all internal and external job postings include the minimum and maximum salary/wage rate that the employer in “good faith” believes it is willing to pay for the advertised job, promotion, or transfer opportunity. The New

As we previously reported, earlier this year New York lawmakers passed a law requiring that all Empire State employers provide their employees with up to four hours of paid time off to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Shortly thereafter, the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) published guidance on the measure, clarifying that: (i)

Last summer, as New York began the process of non-essential business reopenings, the State issued a series of industry-specific workplace health and safety guidelines with which all businesses were and have continued to be required to adhere.  On the heels of recent CDC guidance loosening workplace-related restrictions for vaccinated employees, New York has updated these

As most of our readers likely know by now, on May 13, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that, “[i]f you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic.” The CDC went on the state that “[f]ully vaccinated people can resume activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing.”

Quite understandably, this led many U.S. businesses to wonder whether their workforces are still required to wear a mask or physically distance in the workplace – particularly because the CDC’s guidance also provides that businesses still need to be abide by applicable state and local laws, rules, and regulations concerning mask wearing and physical distancing.

New York State employers, however, need wonder no more. Just a few hours ago, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that, beginning May 19, New York will adopt the CDC’s “Interim Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People” for most business and public settings. To implement the CDC’s guidance, New York State will be revising the following business reopening guidelines to take effect on May 19:Continue Reading BREAKING: New York adopts CDC’s loosened mask and social distancing guidance