Tag Archives: of

European Court confirms obesity can be a disability under EU law

In our previous blog, “Are obese workers protected from discrimination” , we confirmed the advocate general’s opinion in the case of Kaltoft v Municipality of Billund (case C-354/13) that while obese workers were not automatically covered by EU disability discrimination law, the worker may be considered to be disabled where he or she is “severely, … Continue Reading

TUPE service provision change – look at what is going on ‘on the ground’, as well as the contract

In the recent case of Lorne Stewart plc v Hyde and others, the EAT made clear that it is important not to get side-tracked by the details of formal written contracts which are in place between the parties before and after a potential TUPE transfer, if such details do not reflect reality. Rather, it is essential … Continue Reading

NLRB’S “Quickie Election” Rules Invalidated

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia voided the NLRB’s so-called “quickie election” rules because the NLRB lacked the quorum necessary when it adopted its Amended Election Rules to expedite the current union election process. See Chamber of Commerce, et al v. NLRB. Our more in-depth analysis of those amended rules is in our … Continue Reading

TUPE: Service Provision Changes and what activities transfer

The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has held in Johnson Controls v Campbell and Anor that there was no service provision change under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 (“TUPE”) where a centralised taxi booking service was brought back in-house by the client. Although the client was still undertaking the activity of booking taxis, … Continue Reading

‘Costs plus’ approach to justifying discrimination in the UK endorsed by the Court of Appeal

The Court of Appeal in Woodcock v North Cumbria Primary Care Trust has ruled that the savings of costs alone will not, without more, amount to a legitimate aim so as to justify discrimination. In this case, Mr Woodcock was dismissed by reason of redundancy just before his 50th birthday in order to avoid his qualifying … Continue Reading

Disciplinary action and suspension for misconduct: guidance from UK Court of Appeal

The Court of Appeal decision in Crawford and another v Suffolk Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust [2012] EWCA Civ 138 provides guidance as to the procedural standards required in misconduct cases in which dismissal is likely to impact on the employee’s ability to pursue his/her chosen career. The case also highlights the need to consider … Continue Reading

UK Court of Appeal refuses to uphold a barring order against a former employee

This post was also written by Fiona McFarlane. In Caterpillar Logistics Services (UK) Ltd v Huesca de Crean, an employee who had no restrictive covenant in her contract of employment prohibiting her working for a third party, could not be prevented from taking up employment with a client of her former employer on the grounds that she … Continue Reading

Service provision changes: UK EAT gives guidance on the meaning of an “organised grouping of employees”

In the case of Eddie Stobart v Moreman & Others the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has provided welcome guidance on the meaning of “organised grouping of employees” for the purposes of a “service provision change” under regulation 3(3)(a)(i) of the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employees) Regulations 2006 (“TUPE”). A group of employees who happened to … Continue Reading

Expiry of fixed term contracts and UK collective redundancy consultation

  The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has provided guidance on when the expiry of a fixed term contract will count toward the number of dismissals proposed by an employer that triggers collective redundancy consultation obligations. The EAT held that employees who were dismissed by virtue of the expiry of their fixed term contracts were not … Continue Reading

California Court of Appeal Green Lights Repetitive Class Action Litigation

Most employers assume that if they successfully defeat a plaintiff's motion for class certification in a wage and hour class action, the same class claims cannot be raised again in another case. On January 18, 2012, however, the California court of appeal in Bridgeford v. Pacific Health Corp, 2012 WL 130615, dashed that commonly held assumption.… Continue Reading
LexBlog